Mentos and Coke Experiment: How-To Plus Free Worksheet

This explosive experiment teaches kids about physical reactions.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Adding Mentos candy to Coke is the stuff of legend. Every kid has heard the rumors about the explosive combination that results, but how many have actually tried it? While science teachers have been performing this experiment for years, it was first popularized in September of 2005 thanks to a viral video from Steve Spangler Science . The several-foot-high geyser that shoots from the soda bottle is a fun and awe-inspiring hands-on activity that any scientist in the making can perform. Be forewarned though: You’ll probably want to perform this experiment outside.

Read on to learn more about the Mentos and Coke experiment, and fill out the form on this page to grab your free recording sheet for the experiment.

How does the Mentos and Coke experiment work?

In this experiment, you drop Mentos mints into a 2-liter bottle of Coke. Make sure your bottle of soda is on a flat surface in a location where it is OK to make a mess. You then load the Mentos into your paper roll or geyser tube . Once the Mentos are dropped into the soda, they sink to the bottom, which causes the gas to expand and pushes the soda out of the bottle. This creates an exploding geyser effect.

What does the Mentos and Coke experiment teach?

Although you can’t see it, dissolved carbon dioxide is the invisible substance that makes soda bubbly and fizzy. As long as the soda remains in the bottle, the gas is kept in place through the pressurized conditions. When you shake a bottle of soda, some of that gas is released and the bubbles stick to nucleation sites or tiny defects on the inside of the container. If you open the shaken bottle, the bubbles will rapidly rise and push the liquid up and out of the bottle.

Aside from shaking the soda, another way to help the carbon dioxide escape is to drop an object into the bottle. Mentos are the perfect objects, since each candy has many little pits on its surface that serve as nucleation sites. Once the Mentos are dropped into the soda, the bubbles stick to those sites and quickly rise to the surface. The weight of the Mentos drives them to the bottom of the bottle. Then, the gas that is released by the Mentos forces the soda to shoot out of the bottle in a powerful geyser.

Is there a Mentos and Coke video?

This video shows how to do the Mentos and Coke experiment using just a few simple ingredients and supplies.

Materials Needed

To do the Mentos and Coke experiment, you will need:

  • A roll or box of mint-flavored Mentos
  • 2-liter bottle of Coca-Cola (aka Coke)
  • Sheet of paper to roll into a tube OR pre-made geyser tube

Our free recording sheet is also helpful—fill out the form on this page to get it.

Mentos and Coke Experiment Steps

1. make a paper tube by taking a piece of paper and wrapping it around a roll of mentos, then taping it in place. pull the mentos out. alternatively, you can use a premade geyser tube available from amazon or other retailers..

Teacher rolling a paper tube for the Mentos and Coke experiment.

2. If using a geyser tube, load the Mentos. If using a homemade paper roll, drop the Mentos into the roll while holding the bottom closed with your finger.

Teacher putting Mentos into a paper tube for the Mentos and Coke experiment.

3. Placing a 2-liter bottle of Coke on a flat surface, remove the cap, and drop the Mentos into the open Coke bottle.

Teaching stooping outside school doing and experiment with Mentos and Coke.

Grab our free Mentos and Coke experiment worksheet!

Fill out the form on this page to get your worksheet. The worksheet asks kids to guess the correct order of the steps in the experiment. Next, kids must make a prediction about what they think will happen. They can use the provided spaces to draw what happens before and after they add the Mentos. Did their predictions come true?

Additional Reflection Questions

  • What happened when we added the Mentos to the Coke?
  • What difference do you think the temperature of the Coke makes?
  • What do you think would happen if we used different-flavored Mentos, like fruit?
  • What do you think would happen if we used a different soda other than Coke?
  • What do you think would happen if you use Diet Coke?

Can the Mentos and Coke experiment be used for a science fair?

Yes! If you want to do the Mentos and Coke experiment for a science fair, we recommend switching up some of the variables. For example: Does the temperature of the Coke matter? Does the brand of soda matter? Will generic soda produce the same results as the brand-name soda? What happens if you use fruit-flavored Mentos? What happens if you use Diet Coke instead of regular? Form a hypothesis about how changing the variables will impact the experiment. Good luck!

Looking for more experiment ideas? Check out our  big list of experiment ideas here.

Plus, be sure to  subscribe to our newsletters  for more articles like this., you might also like.

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June 14, 2012

Spurting Science: Erupting Diet Coke with Mentos

A carbonated challenge from Science Buddies

By Science Buddies

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Key concepts Chemistry Physics Materials science Carbonation Physical reactions Explosions Introduction Have you ever seen the Diet Coke and Mentos experiment that is all over the Internet and wondered what makes the reaction work? You might think that there is some ingredient in a Mentos candy that causes a chemical reaction with the soda pop, like the way baking soda reacts with vinegar. But the amazing eruption that takes place when Mentos are dropped into Diet Coke or other brands of diet soda pop is not a chemical reaction at all! Instead it is a physical reaction. That means that all of the pieces of the reaction are there, but that they are simply rearranged. It also means changing some factors may cause a larger or smaller physical reaction to take place. Background A carbonated beverage is packed full of dissolved carbon dioxide gas, which forms bonds with water. While the soda is in the bottle, the gas is kept in solution by the bottle's pressurized conditions. When you pour some soda into a glass, some gas escapes and forms foam, but most stays trapped by the surface tension of the water. But all those gas bubbles want to escape, making it no wonder that soda makes you burp! To create bubbles, the carbon dioxide needs to interact with itself, which means that the carbon dioxide's bonds with water in the Diet Coke must be broken. A Mentos candy can help with this. Although the candy may look smooth, if you looked at it under a microscope you'd see tiny bumps coating its entire surface. This rough surface allows the bonds between the carbon dioxide gas and the water to more easily break, helping to create carbon dioxide bubbles and cause the classic eruption. The speed at which the Mentos falls through the soda can affect how large the eruption is, and this can be tested by comparing whole with crushed Mentos, the latter of which are less dense. Materials •    Wax paper •    Cutting board •    Knife •    One roll of Mentos (at least eight candies) •    Two index cards •    Tape •    Two two-liter bottles of Diet Coke •    An outdoor area at least two meters from buildings •    Eye protection (safety goggles or glasses) •    Video camera with either a tripod or a helper to take the images (optional) Preparation •    Place a piece of wax paper on top of the cutting board. On the wax paper, carefully use a knife to crush and cut four Mentos candies into many small pieces. An adult may help you cut up the candies. What does the inside of the candies look like? •    Make a Mentos cartridge to hold the candies for you before you drop them into the Diet Coke bottle by rolling an index card into a tube, slightly larger than the diameter of a Mentos candy. Tape the tube together on the side. •    Be sure to wear eye protection when putting the candies into the cola! •    Wear clothes that you would not mind if they get splashed with a little soda pop—this activity can get a little messy! Procedure •    Place a Diet Coke bottle in an outdoor area, at least two meters from any buildings or anything hanging above the area, such as eaves, overhangs or wires. Make sure that the bottle is on a level surface and stably standing straight. Why do you think all of this is important? •    If you want to videotape the reactions, set up the video camera so that it has in its viewfinder the bottle and a height equivalent to at least the first story of a building. •    Carefully remove the cap from the bottle and place the flat index card on top, covering the hole. •    Add four whole Mentos candies to your cartridge, put on your eye protection, and start the video camera. •    Place your full cartridge on top of the flat index card. Line up where the opening of the bottle is with the opening of your cartridge. Quickly pull out the flat index card, releasing the Mentos candies into the bottle. Then step back without tipping the bottle over or disturbing the reaction. •    How quickly did the reaction start to happen, and how quickly did it stop? About how high did the eruption go? How much cola is left in the bottle? •    When the bottle stops spouting, stop recording. •    Remove the spent cola bottle and place a new full bottle in the same position, again making sure that it is level and stably standing straight. As with the first bottle, remove the cap and place the flat index card on top, covering the hole. •    Add your four crushed Mentos candies to your cartridge, pouring them in from the wax paper. Put on your eye protection and start the video camera. •    Like you did before, place your full cartridge on top of the flat index card, then line up where the opening of the bottle is with the opening of your cartridge. Quickly pull out the flat index card, releasing the crushed Mentos into the bottle, then step back without tipping the bottle over or disturbing the reaction. •    How quickly did the reaction start to happen, and how quickly did it stop? How high did the eruption appear to go? How much liquid is left in the bottle? Is it more or less than the amount that was left when you used whole candies? •    When the bottle stops spouting, stop recording. If you videotaped the reactions, you can watch your videos now. What do you notice from the videos? •    Which reaction went higher, the whole or the crushed Mentos? •    Extra : Find an exterior wall of a building with no windows and set a Diet Coke bottle at the base of the wall. Use a tape measure and blue painter's tape to mark off the height from the top of the bottle in meters. Then repeat this activity three times, with the bottle in front of the tape-marked wall, video taping it each time. When you review the recordings, use slow motion and pause the recording when the spout is at its maximum height. Using the tape marks in the background, estimate the height of the spout. Calculate the average height of the fountains for the whole and for the crushed Mentos . What is the difference in height of the eruptions? •    Extra: What other factors affect the size of the Mentos and Diet Coke eruption? You can try testing different kinds of carbonated beverages, different kinds of candies with different shapes and textures or using other things to start the reaction, like rock salt, pennies or dice. Which beverages, candies or other things cause the largest and smallest fountains? Why do you think this is? •    Extra: Do this activity again but instead of testing whole Mentos versus crushed, compare warm versus cold Diet Coke. Does temperature affect the eruption height? Observations and results Was the eruption higher when whole Mentos candies were used compared with crushed candies? Was less Diet Coke left in the bottle after the reaction with the whole candies compared with the crushed ones? In the Diet Coke bottle the Mentos candy provides a rough surface that allows the bonds between the carbon dioxide gas and water to break more easily, helping to create carbon dioxide bubbles. As the Mentos candy sinks in the bottle, the candy causes the production of more and more carbon dioxide bubbles, and the rising bubbles react with carbon dioxide that is still dissolved in the soda to cause more carbon dioxide to be freed and create even more bubbles, resulting in the eruption. Because Mentos candies are rather dense, they sink rapidly through the liquid, causing a fast, large eruption. The crushed Mentos candies, however, are not as dense as the whole ones, which causes them to sink more slowly, creating a relatively small cola fountain, which should also leave more liquid in the bottle than the larger eruption with whole Mentos candies did. Cleanup Hose off any part of a building that was splashed with Diet Coke. If you try this project with regular Coke, the eruption should still happen but its sugary content may make cleaning more difficult. More to explore Physicists Explain Mentos–Soda Spray from Scientific American Science of Mentos–Diet Coke explosions explained from New Scientist The Science of Coke and Mentos from EepyBird.com Why do Mentos mints foam when you drop them into soda pop? from General Chemistry Online Coke® & Mentos®—Nucleation Goes Nuclear! from Science Buddies

This activity brought to you in partnership with Science Buddies

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Mentos and Coke Experiment – How to Do It! [Full Guide]

Have you ever taken a can of soda, shook it up, and given it to your friend?

What happens?

Well, it’s probably not pretty. And you may not have a friend for a day or two until they forgive you.

But making soda explode is fun. And there is a way to make it really go boom if you have a few pennies and a bit of time on your hands.

Note – be sure to only try this experiment with a responsible adult!

Diet Coke Mentos

It really only takes a few minutes to setup the mentos and coke volcano experiment. And it’s a great way to learn about chemical reactions.

It’s also a lot less work than your classic paper mache volcano. So, if you want some quick and easy fun, get some paper towels because we’re about to make a sweet mess.

What Will I Need For The Mentos And Coke Volcano?

There really aren’t that many supplies you need to make a mentos and coke volcano.

But here’s the list:

An outdoor area with no ceiling or roof

One roll of Mentos candies

A two-liter bottle of diet soda (diet soda makes for a much better reaction, but you can use regular soda if you like. It just won’t be nearly as awesome.)

A tube the width of the Mentos . It needs to be wide enough to use as loader for the Mentos

An index card (picture below)

Index Card

The Mentos And Coke Volcano Experiment

Now it’s time to actually run the experiment, but first, we need to make a hypothesis.

The Hypothesis

The scientific method is an important way scientists make observations and come to conclusions.

Part of the scientific method is making a prediction called a hypothesis .

Write down what you think will happen when placing the Mentos in the soda bottles.

Do a little bit of research about the ingredients of Mentos and soda.

This will help you make an informed guess as to what will happen.

Lightning bolt

Now You Test The Hypothesis

In an experiment, you have two groups: an experimental group, and a control group.

Open the soda bottle, set it down and write down what you observe about it.

This will count as your control group. It’s what happens when you put nothing in the soda.

Mentos Bottle

Now take the Mentos in your tube loader.

Put the index card on top of the tube loader and turn the tube upside down.

The candy should not fall out.

Be ready. The reaction happens fast, so don’t have your face over the bottle.

Place the index card and candies over the mouth of the bottle. Make sure the candies are in line with the mouth of the bottle.

You want the candies going in the bottle and not falling over the side.

Now remove the index card and let candies fall in and step away from the Mentos and coke volcano.

Mentos Coke Geyser

Write down what happened when you dropped the Mentos in the coke.

Did what you hypothesize happen? Compare your notes on the experiment to the control group.

Let us know what you observed in your science experiment!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION

1. can i use any type of mentos candy for the experiment.

Yes, you can use any type of Mentos candy for the experiment. The most commonly used Mentos candies are the original mint-flavored ones, but you can also use fruit-flavored or other varieties. The key factor is the rough surface of the Mentos candy, which helps to create nucleation sites for the carbon dioxide bubbles in the Coke. This happens because Coke contains dissolved carbon dioxide gas.

2. What happens if I use diet Coke instead of regular Coke?

If you use cold diet Coke instead of regular Coke in the Mentos experiment, you can still expect an explosive reaction. However, the reaction may not be as vigorous as with regular Coke. Diet Coke contains artificial sweeteners like aspartame, which may slightly affect the reaction. Nonetheless, the combination of Mentos and diet Coke can still produce a notable geyser, so it’s worth giving it a try. SO it will be the mentos geyser experiment.

3. Is the Mentos and Coke experiment suitable for children to try at home?

The Coke and Mentos experiment can be a fun and engaging activity for children to try at home. However, ensuring proper adult supervision and following safety precautions is important. Conducting the mentos experiment outdoors or in a well-ventilated area is recommended to avoid any potential mess or accidental spills. Additionally, remind children not to consume the Coke or Mentos mixture, as it is unsafe for ingestion. By taking these precautions, the Coke and Mentos experiment can provide children an educational and entertaining experience.

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The Infamous Coke and Mentos Experiment

September 11, 2014 By Emma Vanstone 1 Comment

The science experiments my children talk about for months afterwards are generally the messy ones, like our splatter patterns , glow in the dark oobleck ,  baking soda experiments and the well known coke and mento experiment .

If you try this classic chemis t ry experiment definitely do it outside as it’s VERY messy and sticky. Sometimes you’ll see it called a coke and mento geyse r, as the eruption looks like a geyser!

The Andernach Geyser

Coke and Mentos Experiment

You’ll need:.

Coke or other fizzy soda

Instructions

We dropped two Mentos into a bottle of normal Cola and Diet Cola. I used the cheapest brands available in our local supermarket.

Diet coke and normal coke for a coke and mento geyser eruption

Once you drop the Mentos into the coke, stand back as it’s VERY explosive. The trick is to drop the mento in as fast as you can. If too much of the fizz escapes before you add the mento the reaction won’t be as good.

Coke and mento geyser

What happens when Coke and Mentos mix?

There are several theories, but it’s thought that the many small pores on the surface of the mento speed up the release of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas from the soda as they give a larger surface area for the reaction to occur over, causing foam to erupt at a super fast rate.

Which soda works best with Mentos?

Any fizzy drink will produce a similar effect, but diet drinks seem to work best, as we found in our investigation. This is most likely due to the particular chemicals in diet drinks.

The reaction isn’t a chemical reaction but a physical reaction! The molecules haven’t been chemically changed, just re-arranged!

See Steve Spangler for a much more thorough explanation of this very cool experiment .

Does the number of mentos affect the height?

More Mentos candies should mean a better explosion, but there is a limit to how many will actually make a difference. We found 7 to be the maximum number we could drop in at once.

More Coke and Mentos Eruption Ideas

Investigate to find out if the type of fizzy drink matters. Does diet soda make a taller geyser?

Try lots of different sodas and diet sodas.

Test fruit-flavoured Mentos instead of mint flavoured.

Find out if the number of mentos affects the height of the geyser.

Investigate to discover what would happen if you left the top off the Cola for a few minutes before adding the Mento.

Use the reaction to power something? Maybe a LEGO car?

Design a device to drop several mentos into the bottle at the same time. Can you find out what the optimum number of mentos for a 2-litre bottle of soda is?

Image of a coke and mento explosion in a garden

Last Updated on April 9, 2024 by Emma Vanstone

Safety Notice

Science Sparks ( Wild Sparks Enterprises Ltd ) are not liable for the actions of activity of any person who uses the information in this resource or in any of the suggested further resources. Science Sparks assume no liability with regard to injuries or damage to property that may occur as a result of using the information and carrying out the practical activities contained in this resource or in any of the suggested further resources.

These activities are designed to be carried out by children working with a parent, guardian or other appropriate adult. The adult involved is fully responsible for ensuring that the activities are carried out safely.

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December 17, 2019 at 7:20 pm

It will also work better the warmer the soda is

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Taming Little Monsters

Coke and Mentos Experiment – Easy STEM for Kids

Categories Science , STEM

The Coke and Mentos Experiment is an easy science experiment to do with kids of all ages. Even toddlers and preschoolers will shriek with delight as they watch this chemical reaction take place.

Looking for science activities for kids? Try the coke and mentos experiment. A fun and easy STEM activity for toddlers and preschoolers.

Disclosure: Adult supervision is required for all activities at all times.

Table of Contents

  • More STEM activities to try
  • Materials needed
  • Watch the video

Instructions

  • Experiment ideas
  • How does it work?

STEM Activities for Kids

Help your toddlers and preschoolers become the next new scientist or engineer with these fun STEM activities. These are great for getting little learners involved in STEM through hands-on play.

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For more ideas check out 34 STEM Experiments for Toddlers .

Materials Needed

  • A large bottle of coke
  • A packet of mentos
  • A plastic tub
  • Hot glue gun and hot glue sticks (optional)

Watch the Video

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Coke and Mentos Experiment Instructions

1: use the hot glue gun to glue 6 mentos together..

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

You can always use more or less mentos if you need to, the number of mentos will depend on how large your bottle of coke is. 

Gluing the mentos together is an optional step, but one that I find invaluable when doing this experiment with toddlers and preschoolers. Because the reaction happens instantly, it’s hard to drop all of the mentos in before the coke starts to come out of the bottle.

By creating a mentos tower, the kids can drop all of the mentos in at once.

2. Place your bottle of coke in a large tub. 

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Once again the tub is optional and is only used to help clean up afterwards. If you prefer, you can do this experiment outside on the grass. Just make sure that your outdoor area has a flat surface you can use. If the bottle of soda falls over before you’ve dropped in the mentos candy, you’re going to be disappointed.

3. Drop your mentos tower into the bottle of coke, stand back and enjoy.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Different Ways to turn this into an Experiment

If you are doing this experiment with older children, you can use the scientific method to see which conditions affect the height of the geyser.

Idea 1. Change the Temperature.

Does cold, room temperature, or warm soda affect the amazing eruption? Place a bottle in the fridge, one in the sun and one at room temperature to find out if any of these temperatures create a large eruption.

Idea 2. How many mentos are needed in a coke and mentos experiment?

You’ll need at least 7 – 8 mentos for this activity. However you can always experiment with a different number of mentos to find out. Set up several soda bottles and then place a different number of mentos in each bottle and measure the fountain height to see which worked best.

Idea 3. Which soda works best with mentos?

You can use any type of soda pop you like for this experiment. While it’s believed that Diet Coke has the most impressive results, the truth is that there isn’t much difference in the height of the eruption between diet and regular soda.

The main difference is when cleaning up. Regular coke becomes sticky because of the high sugar content. While diet soda instead contains artificial sweeteners. Cleaning up the mess is another reason why outdoors is the perfect place to do this soda experiment.

However, you can always experiment with different types of soda and see what happens. Mountain dew, classic diet coke, orange soda are all options you can try.

How does the coke and mentos experiment work? Coke and Mentos Explained

Coke, and other carbonated beverages are filled with dissolved carbon dioxide gas. This gas has formed bonds with the water in the soda. 

In order for the mentos reaction to take place, the gas needs to break the bonds with the water and interact with the rest of the carbon dioxide gas in the coke. When carbon dioxide interacts with itself it forms gas bubbles. That is why we can see bubbles form when we pour a glass of coke to drink or shake the bottle up.

When you drop a tower of mentos into the bottle, they break the bonds that hold the carbon dioxide gas and water together. Because the mentos tower sinks to the bottom of the bottle, instead of floating, this means that the whole bottle will undergo this reaction at once.

These bubbles come rushing out at great speed and because the coke bottle has a small opening, the bubbles rush high into the air. Creating an eruption effect.

While toddlers and preschoolers aren’t going to understand why this chemical reaction takes place, it’s still cool to learn as an adult. I love Steve Spangler’s explanation of the chemistry involved in this STEM idea.

Are you going to try the Coke and Mentos Experiment with your kids? Don’t forget to Pin the idea for later.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Coke and Mentos Experiment

Looking for science activities for kids? Try the coke and mentos experiment. A fun and easy STEM activity for toddlers and preschoolers.

The  Coke and Mentos Experiment  is an easy science experiment to do with kids of all ages. Even toddlers and preschoolers will shriek with delight as they watch this chemical reaction take place.

  • Use the hot glue gun to glue 7 - 8 mentos together. This is optional, it just helps to add all of the mentos into the bottle at the same time.
  • Place your bottle of coke in a large tub. This is optional, it just makes cleaning up more easy.
  • Drop your mentos tower into the bottle.
  • Stand back and enjoy.

If you are doing this STEM activity with older kids, you can experiment with a few different ideas to introduce them to the scientific method.

  • Change the temperature of the coke. Experiment to see if cold, warm or room temperature coke changes the reaction.
  • Change the number of mentos.
  • Experiment to see which soda works best. Coke, diet coke or any other kind of soda. Which one has the best results?

More Play Based Learning for Kids

STEM activities for kids. 42 fun and easy play ideas that teach kids all about STEM through hands-on learning.

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How to Make a Mentos & Diet Soda Chemical Volcano Eruption

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Chemical volcanoes are classic projects for science fairs and chemistry demonstrations. The ​ Mentos and diet soda volcano is similar to the baking soda volcano , except the eruption is really powerful, capable of producing jets of soda several feet high. It's messy, so you might want to do this project outdoors or in a bathroom. It's also non-toxic, so kids can do this project. This simple  chemical volcano takes a few minutes to set up and erupts for a few seconds

What You Need

  • Roll of Mentos candies
  • 2-liter bottle of diet soda
  • Test tube or sheet of paper
  • A mop for cleanup

Making the Mentos and Soda Erupt

  • First, gather your supplies. You can substitute another candy for the Mentos, such as M&Ms or Skittles, but ideally, you want candies that stack into a neat column with minimal space between them, have a chalky consistency, and barely fit through the mouth of a 2-liter bottle.
  • Similarly, you could substitute normal soda for diet soda. The project will work just as well, but the resulting eruption will be sticky. Whatever you use, the beverage has to be carbonated!
  • First, you need to stack the candies. The easiest way to do this is to stack them in a test tube narrow enough to form a single column. Otherwise, you can roll a sheet of paper into a tube just barely wide enough for a stack of candies.
  • Place an index card over the opening of the test tube or end of the paper tube to hold the candies in the container. Invert the test tube.
  • Open your full 2-liter bottle of diet soda. The eruption happens very quickly, so set things up: you want the open bottle/index card/roll of candies so that as soon as you remove the index card, the candies will drop smoothly into the bottle.
  • When you're ready, do it! You can repeat the eruption with the same bottle and another stack of candies. Have fun!

How the Mentos and Diet Soda Experiment Works

The Diet Coke and Mentos geyser is the result of a physical process rather than a chemical reaction. There's a lot of carbon dioxide dissolves in the soda, which gives it its fizz. When you drop a Mentos into the soda, tiny bumps on the candy surface give the carbon dioxide molecules a nucleation site or place to stick. As more and more carbon dioxide molecules accumulate, bubbles form. Mentos candies are heavy enough they sink, so they interact with carbon dioxide all the way to the bottom of the container. The bubbles expand as they rise. The partially dissolved candy is sticky enough to trap the gas, forming a foam. Because there's so much pressure, it all happens very quickly. The narrow opening of a soda bottle funnels the foam to make a geyser.

If you use a nozzle that makes the opening at the top of the bottle even smaller, the jet of liquid will go even higher. You can also experiment using regular Coke (as opposed to the diet versions) or tonic water (which glows blue under a black light).

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Science Fun

Science Fun

Mentos Exploding Soda Easy Science Experiment

In the quick and easy science experiment, we are going to show you how to make your very own Mentos launcher that you can use to make an exploding soda. 

  • A 2-liter Diet Coke. Regular Coke is sticky so we recommend the Diet soda. 
  • Piece on construction paper
  • Roll of Mentos

Instructions:

  • Cut a 3 inch by 2 inch rectangle of construction paper.
  • Orient the long end of the rectangle piece of construction paper along the length of the roll of Mentos.
  • Fold the construction paper around the roll of Mentos to create a cylinder shape.
  • Tape the edge of the construction paper securely and slide it off of the tube of Mentos.
  • Use the hole punch to make a hole near the bottom of the cylinder.
  • Now make another hole on the other side of the cylinder that aligns and is directly across from the first hole.
  • Cut a three inch piece of the straw.
  • Slide the piece of straw through both holes. These will create a barrier to keep Mentos from falling through until you are ready for them to do so.
  • Remove the cap from the 2-liter Diet Coke.
  • Tape the construction paper cylinder around the mouth of the 2-liter soda bottle. 
  • Find an outside area that is easy to clean up and can get a little messy. Look up and make sure there is nothing overhead.
  • Making sure the straw is still in place, add three or four Mentos to the cylinder.
  • Start a countdown. Three, Two, One, Pull!
  • Pull the straw and step back quickly.
  • Observe what happens when the Mentos fall into the soda. 

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How it Works:

As the Mentos sinks to the bottom of the soda, it causes the quick production of carbon dioxide bubbles. These rising carbon dioxide bubbles react with more carbon dioxide still in the soda causing it to release as well. The pressure builds up and then creates the eruption or geyser of soda. 

Make This A Science Project:

Test different types of soda. Test different volumes of soda. There are many flavors of Mentos so you can test these for different effects. You may also want to try different amounts of Mentos to see if there is a visible difference in the height of the eruption. Try different temperatures of soda. 

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Gilla: Dela:
  • 1 roll of Mentos mint (it must be mint)
  • A 1.5 or 2 L bottle of Diet Coke (Coca-Cola Light)
  • 1 tube, open in one end - This tube must fit all of the Mentos stacked on top of each other, just like in the Mentos roll. And when open in one end, all the Mentos should quickly slide out. In some countries, there are these aspirin tubes that are perfect. Otherwise, make a tube out of paper and tape, slightly wider than the Mentos roll.
  • 1 plastic card, such as a playing card or a discount card

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Short explanation

Long explanation.

  • How is the eruption affected by changing the Mentos mint to other candys?
  • How is the eruption affected by changing the Diet coke to other drinks?
  • How is the eruption affected by the temperature of the Diet Coke?
Gilla: Dela:

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Steve Spangler

Mentos and Diet Coke Experiment

How to turn a bottle of soda and a roll of mentos into an exploding soda geyser.

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Mentos Geyser Experiment - Cover Image

It’s been called the “vinegar and baking soda” reaction for a new generation. While science teachers have been dropping candies and mints into 2-liter bottles of soda for years to release all of the dissolved carbon dioxide, the Mentos and Diet Coke reaction became world-famous in 2005. Fueled by hundreds of blogs and popular online sharing sites like youtube, this once obscure reaction became an Internet sensation. Once you get past the initial gee-whiz factor, there’s some amazing science behind a carbonated beverage and a chewy mint.

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This full version of this experiment appears in Steve Spangler’s book called Naked Eggs and Flying Potatoes – Unforgettable Experiments That Make Science Fun

Experiment Videos

Here's What You'll Need

A roll or box of mentos chewy mints (stick with the standard mint flavor for now), 2-liter bottle of diet soda (either diet or regular soda will work for this experiment, but diet soda is not sticky when you’re cleaning it up, and it will usually create a bigger blast), sheet of paper to roll into a tube, steve spangler’s geyser tube toy (optional . . . but highly recommended), let's try it.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

This activity is probably best done outside in the middle of an abandoned field or on a huge lawn.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Carefully open the bottle of diet soda. Again, the choice of diet over regular soda is purely a preference based on the fact that erupting regular soda becomes a sticky mess to clean up because it contains sugar. Diet soda uses artificial sweeteners instead of sugar, and consequently, it’s not sticky. Later on in the experiment, you’ll be invited to compare the geyser power of diet versus regular soda, but for now we’ll start with a 2-liter bottle of diet soda.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Position the bottle on the ground so that it will not tip over.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Let’s start with seven Mentos for our first attempt. The goal is to drop all seven Mentos into the bottle of soda at the same time (which is trickier than you might think). One method for doing this is to roll a piece of paper into a tube just big enough to hold the loose Mentos. Other methods include using a large plastic test tube to hold the Mentos or using my Geyser Tube toy invention, which was created to solve this very problem. Assuming that you’re using the paper tube method, you’ll want to load the seven Mentos into the tube, cover the bottom of the tube with your finger, and position the tube directly over the mouth of the bottle. When you pull your finger out of the way, all seven Mentos should fall into the bottle at the same time.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Enough waiting . . . this anticipation is killing me. 3-2-1 drop the Mentos!

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

This final step is very important . . . run away! But don’t forget to look back at the amazing eruption of soda.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

If spectators were watching your exploits, someone is bound to yell out, “Do it again!” and that’s exactly what you’re going to do.

How Does It Work

Why do Mentos turn ordinary bottles of diet soda into geysers of fun? The answer is a little more complicated than you might think. Let’s start with the soda . . .

Soda pop is made of sugar or artificial sweetener, flavoring, water, and preservatives. The thing that makes soda bubbly is invisible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), which is pumped into bottles at the bottling factory using lots of pressure. If you shake a bottle or can of soda, some of the gas comes out of the solution and the bubbles cling to the inside walls of the container (thanks to tiny pits and imperfections on the inside surface of the bottle called nucleation sites ). When you open the container, the bubbles quickly rise to the top pushing the liquid out of the way. In other words, the liquid sprays everywhere.

DOWNLOAD THE FULL MENTOS AND DIET COKE EXPERIMENT

Is there another way for the CO 2 to escape? Try this. Drop an object like a raisin or a piece of uncooked pasta into a glass of soda and notice how bubbles immediately form on the surface of the object. These are CO 2 bubbles leaving the soda and attaching themselves to the object. For example, adding salt to soda causes it to foam up because thousands of little bubbles form on the surface of each grain of salt. This bubbling process is called nucleation , and the places where the bubbles form, whether on the sides of the can, on an object, or around a tiny grain of salt, are the nucleation sites.

Why are Mentos so Special? The reason why Mentos work so well is twofold—tiny pits on the surface of the mint, and the weight of the Mentos itself. Each Mentos mint has thousands of tiny pits all over the surface. These tiny pits act as nucleation sites—perfect places for CO 2 bubbles to form. As soon as the Mentos hit the soda, bubbles form all over the surfaces of the candies and then quickly rise to the surface of the liquid. Couple this with the fact that the Mentos candies are heavy and sink to the bottom of the bottle and you’ve got a double whammy. The gas released by the Mentos literally pushes all of the liquid up and out of the bottle in an incredible soda blast.

Measuring the Height of the Geyser To make any of these tests meaningful, you need to find a way to measure the height of the eruption. A friend or parent with a video camera is a great way to watch and document the results of your experiment, but you’ll also need some specific measurements or data. Try placing the soda bottle next to the wall of a brick building (after getting permission from the building’s owner). Measure the height of the geyser by counting the number of bricks that are wet once the geyser stops. If you want a more specific measurement, use chalk to mark off 1-foot increments on the brick wall before you drop the Mentos into the bottle of soda. Make comparisons, create a chart with your data, and draw some conclusions. Be sure to thank the building’s owner and to hose off the wall of the building when you are finished!

Measuring the Volume of the Geyser If you want to examine the volume of the geyser instead of the height, make note of the volume of a full bottle of soda before you drop the Mentos into it. (Okay, it’s a trick question because a 2-liter bottle of soda holds . . . 2 liters!) Once the geyser stops, pour out the remaining contents of the bottle and measure how much liquid is left. You could use a beaker or a graduated cylinder to measure the remaining liquid in milliliters. Remember that 1 liter is equivalent to 1000 mL. Subtract the remaining amount of liquid from the original volume of the bottle to calculate the volume of the geyser. Then make comparisons, create a chart with your data, and draw some conclusions.

How Many Mentos Work Best? This has to be the number one question everyone asks about this experiment. What is the best number of Mentos to use to make the highest-shooting geyser? This is a great topic for a science project—you’ll need lots of soda and Mentos, and a few friends to help record all of the data.

Be sure that the soda bottles are all the same brand and type. It’s also important that all of the test bottles are stored in the same place so that the liquid in each bottle is the same temperature.

Line up a row of ten 2-liter bottles against a brick wall (see “Measuring the Height of the Geyser”). Each bottle will receive a different number of Mentos. Drop one Mentos into the first bottle and record the height by counting the wet bricks (or set up your own scale behind each soda bottle). Drop two Mentos into the second bottle, and so on until you’ve completed all ten bottles.

Of course, this could go on forever, but you’ll start to see a trend in your data that shows the maximum height of the geyser for a certain number of Mentos. Many soda geyser-ologists believe that seven Mentos produce the highest-shooting geyser. Using any more than seven Mentos is just a waste, according to these soda-soaked science enthusiasts. What do your results reveal about the effect of the number of Mentos on the height of the geyser?

The Brand Test You guessed it . . . it’s time to put your favorite soda to the test. Does one brand produce higher-flying geysers? How does generic soda stack up against the big name brands? If you’re doing a science fair project, your initial question might be, “What is the effect of the brand of soda on the height of the geyser?”

Use your data from the previous test to determine the standard number of Mentos to use for this test. The only variable you’ll change in this test is the brand of soda while everything else remains the same (the number of Mentos and the amount of soda). Again, make sure all of the soda is at the same temperature because temperature plays an important role in the reaction. The brand of soda is the only thing that changes (the variable). Just think . . . your results could help determine the next Mentos Geyser craze!

The Temperature Test What is the effect of temperature on the height of the geyser? Does warm soda shoot up higher than cold soda? The key is to keep every launch fair and to make sure the only variable is the temperature of the soda. You’ll need a thermometer to record the temperature of the soda just before you launch it.

To enforce the fairness factor, you must stick with one brand of soda for the entire test. Let’s use Diet Coke in this example. You’ll want to purchase three bottles of Diet Coke and two rolls of Mentos. You’re going to set up three tests—warm soda, room temperature soda, and cold soda. Place one bottle of Diet Coke in the refrigerator and let it sit overnight. Place the second bottle in a place where it can reach room temperature overnight. There are two safe ways to warm the other bottle of soda. The simplest method is to let the unopened bottle sit in the sun for several hours. You can also place the bottle of unopened soda in a bucket of warm water. Never use a stove or microwave to heat a bottle of soda.

It’s time to return to your launching site. Check to make sure your measuring scale is in place (counting bricks or using an alternative scale against the wall). Let’s start with the bottle of cold Diet Coke. Open the bottle and dip the thermometer down into the soda. Record the temperature. Load seven Mentos into your paper roll and drop them into the soda. Immediately record the data for the cold soda test. Repeat the same procedure for the bottle of soda at room temperature and for the bottle of warm soda. It’s important to use the same number of Mentos for each test and to drop them the same way.

No matter which brand of soda you tested, the warm bottle probably produced the highest-shooting geyser. Warm soda tends to fizz much more than cold soda. Why? The answer lies in the solubility of gases in liquids. The warmer the liquid, the less gas can be dissolved in that liquid. The colder the liquid, the more gas can be dissolved in that liquid. This is because as the liquid is heated, the gas within that liquid is also heated, causing the gas molecules to move faster and faster. As the molecules move faster, they diffuse out of the liquid, leaving less gas dissolved in that liquid. In colder liquids the gas molecules move very slowly, causing them to diffuse out of the solution much more slowly. More gas tends to stay in solution when the liquid is cold. This is why at the bottling plant CO 2 is pumped into the cans or bottles when the fluid is just above freezing—around 35 degrees Fahrenheit. This low temperature allows the maximum amount of CO 2 to dissolve in the soda, keeping the carbonation levels as high as possible.

Take It Further

Simply dropping Mentos into a bottle of soda to make a geyser isn’t really science—it’s just a fun trick to do in the backyard. The real learning takes place when you start to change one variable at a time to see how it affects the performance of the geyser.

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The Big Blast After completing all of these tests, you’ve become somewhat of a Mentos Geyser expert who has the research to support the answer to the question, “How can you make the highest-shooting Mentos geyser?” Each test isolated an independent variable, and combining all of the information you discovered into one launch is a great way to wrap up your science fair project. For example, based on your individual test results, you might have arrived at this recipe for the best Mentos Geyser:

  • Use a bottle of Diet Coke
  • Make sure the soda is at least 85 degree Fahrenheit
  • Drop seven Mentos into the soda all at the same time

By using the scientific method and some critical thinking skills, you’ve successfully turned a great gee-whiz science trick into a research-based science fair project.

Science Fair Connection

You might ask yourself, “Can I use the Mentos Geyser for my science fair project?” The answer is YES, but you’ll need to learn how to turn a cool science activity into a real science experiment. The secret is to turn your attention away from the spraying soda and concentrate on setting up an experiment where you isolate a single variable and observe the results.

To get the best results in a science experiment, you need to standardize the test conditions as much as possible. The biggest challenge in the Mentos Geyser experiment is finding a consistent way to drop the Mentos into the soda every time. The original reason I invented the Geyser Tube toy was to find a way to standardize the actual drop of the Mentos. If you’re not using the Geyser Tube, make sure to come up with your own method for dropping the Mentos into the soda the same way each time.

Mentos Geyser History—From Obscurity to Instant Celebrity

As strange as it might sound, the Mentos Geyser never actually started out using Mentos chewy mints. This science demonstration was popular among chemistry teachers back in the 1980s using a roll of Wintergreen LifeSavers and a pipe cleaner. Teachers threaded the roll of Wintergreen LifeSavers onto a pipe cleaner as an easy way to drop all of the LifeSavers into the soda at the same time. Within seconds of dropping the candies into the soda, a huge geyser would erupt from the bottle.

However, by the end of the 1990s, the manufacturer of Wintergreen LifeSavers increased the size of the mints (no one was ever certain why this happened), making the diameter of the candy too large to fit into the mouth of the soda bottle. Science teachers started experimenting (as they like to do) with other candies and mints that would have the same effect when dropped into a bottle of soda. As luck would have it, the solution to the problem was within arm’s reach of the Wintergreen LifeSavers in the candy aisle—it was Mentos chewy mints.

Because Mentos mints didn’t have holes in the middle like LifeSavers, getting them into the bottle was tricky. Everyone found their own method of quickly dropping the Mentos into the soda. Some people fashioned a tube out of paper while others used a piece of plastic tubing to load the Mentos. At the time, my solution was to load the Mentos candies into something called a Baby Soda Bottle—a test tube–like container that held an entire roll of Mentos perfectly. Oddly enough, this container was actually a “pre-form” or 2-liter soda bottle before it was blown up into a big bottle. That’s why it’s called a Baby Soda Bottle. However, I must admit that even with the Baby Soda Bottle method, the results were not very consistent and it was challenging to get away from the bottle before it exploded. So, I solicited help from our creative team at Steve Spangler Science to come up with a Geyser Tube— a better, more consistent way to drop the Mentos into the bottle. Better yet, if we could trigger the drop of the Mentos from a distance, we wouldn’t get as wet.

The next few months were spent building trigger devices ranging from plastic tubes with sliding doors to magnets that held metal stoppers in place to an elaborate battery-operated switch that was triggered by a motion detector. We even played with ways of using the Geyser Tube to trigger multiple soda geysers in a method similar to a Rube Goldberg machine. But the bottom line was that we needed to find a way to standardize the drop of the Mentos.

As they say, the simplest design usually turns out to be the best and most elegant solution to the problem. The winning Geyser Tube design was a clear plastic tube with a special fitting that twisted onto any soda bottle. The trigger pin at the bottom of the tube prevented the Mentos from falling into the bottle until you pulled the string attached to the pin. The moment the pin was pulled, a slider ring resting above the pin fell into place and covered the holes where the trigger pin once was, and the Mentos dropped into the soda. But there was one added bonus . . . the restricted hole at the top of the plastic tube helped to build up more pressure in the bottle and launched the soda 30 feet into the air. Fortunately, the maker of Mentos (Perfetti Van Melle) also liked the design, and we launched the Mentos Geyser Tube toy at the New York Toy Fair in February 2007. The Geyser Tube toy is currently available in toy stores and mass-market retailers throughout the country thanks to our distributor, Be Amazing Toys!

The Mentos Geyser became one of my featured demonstrations both on television and during my live stage presentations. While I had performed variations of the Mentos Geyser experiment on television many times from 2001 to 2004, my performance of the demo in September of 2005 in the backyard of NBC affiliate KUSA-TV in Denver proved to be the tipping point as the demo went from relative obscurity to Internet sensation.

My cohost for the KUSA-TV science segment was the lovely Kim Christiansen. During the commercial break, I told Kim what was going to happen and reminded her to pull her hand out of the way of the erupting geyser and to run backward. Unfortunately, Kim got so caught up in the fun that she forgot to do both . . . and got soaked in Diet Coke on live television. To add insult to injury, she did it two more times, each time getting covered in more soda, until her once pink dress was more Coke-colored than pink.

KUSA-TV News posted that original video on their website along with my blog post titled, “News Anchor Gets Soaked!” Within a few weeks, links to the video and my blog entry numbered in the thousands. I also posted the video on a new online video sharing site called YouTube (YouTube was only 7 months old at the time), and as they say, the rest is history. Within the next 12 months, over 800 Mentos Geyser-related videos were posted on YouTube, making the demo one of the most popular pop-culture science experiments in recent history.

Million Dollar Question

You know the Mentos Geyser is a popular experiment when a producer from ABC’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire calls for help writing a question. Here’s the question we came up with: In an experiment popularized online, what candy creates an explosive geyser when dropped into a 2-liter Diet Coke bottle?

A) Skittles B) Mint Mentos C) Atomic Fireballs D) Lemon Heads

The question was asked on a special College Week episode of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. The participant got it right for $8,000, saying: “I saw it on TV and I bought Mentos and a 2-liter bottle of Diet Coke . . . so I’m going to go with Mentos. That’s my final answer.” The contestant ended up doing really well, going all the way to the $250,000 question, but he walked away with $125,000.

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Have you ever noticed that when you put a straw in soda pop, the straw gets a lot of bubbles on it? Why does that happen? And will it happen if you put other stuff in soda pop?

    1. Very slowly and carefully, open a new bottle of colorless soda.

    2. Tilt the cup and slowly pour the soda down the inside of the cup to make as few bubbles as possible.  

3. Place a straw in the soda and look at the straw from the side.   

4.  Take the straw out of the soda and put a pipe cleaner in. Look from the side to see if bubbles also form on the pipe cleaner. 

5. Now take the pipe cleaner out and place a Mento in the soda. Watch the Mento from the side to see what happens.

 What to expect

Bubbles will form on the straw and very quickly and completely cover the pipe cleaner.

What's happening in there?

Why do the bubbles form on the different things you put in the soda?

The bubbles are made of a gas called carbon dioxide. The soda company puts carbon dioxide in the soda to make the soda fizzy.

Also, the things you put in the soda aren’t really as smooth as they look with just your eyes. If you could look at the straw, pipe cleaner, and Mento with a super-strong microscope you would see that they have tiny dents, scratches, and bumps on them. 

The carbon dioxide molecules collect on these places and form bubbles which rise to the surface.

Make a Mentos-and-Soda Fountain!

There is a pretty cool thing you can do with a bottle of soda pop and a packet of Mentos. Let’s try it!

First, make a tube for the Mentos.

Wrap the paper around the pack of Mentos to make a tube

1. Cut a piece of paper so that it is as wide as a roll of Mentos.

2. Wrap the paper around the pack of Mentos to make a tube. Use masking tape to tape the tube closed. Remove the pack of Mentos from the tube.

3. Close off one end of the tube by cutting a little circle or square of paper and taping it to one end of the tube.

4. Open the pack of Mentos and place all of them in the tube.

Now, make a Mentos-and-soda fountain!

Slowly and carefully open a new bottle of Diet Coke

1. Slowly and carefully open a new bottle of Diet Coke.  

2. Place it on a flat area outside where it is OK to get wet with soda.

3. Put the open end of your tube of Mentos on the card and place it directly over the opening of the soda bottle.

4. When you are ready, remove the card and let all the Mentos drop into the soda at once and quickly move out of the way.

Bubbles and soda will quickly shoot out of the bottle in a high fountain.

The carbon dioxide molecules attach to the surfaces of the Mentos like they did in the cup of soda. All those Mentos in a lot of soda make a lot of bubbles that rise to the surface and push the soda out in a big woosh!

Bubbles and soda will quickly shoot out of the bottle in a high fountain

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Diet Coke and Mentos Eruption

Love fizzing and exploding science experiments ? YES!! Well, here’s another one the kids are sure to love! All you need is a pack of Mentos candy and Diet Coke. You might think there’s a chemical reaction happening, but this Mentos and soda experiment is a great example of a physical reaction.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Mentos and Diet Coke Eruption

Is the reaction between Coke and Mentos a chemical reaction? With all the fizzing and foaming, it looks like there must be a chemical reaction between the Mentos and diet Coke, like our elephant toothpaste or baking soda and vinegar volcano .

However, you might be surprised that this experiment is an example of a physical change . Read on to find out why Mentos makes Coke explode if there is no Mentos and Coke chemical reaction.

adding mentos to diet coke

  • 2 liter Diet Coke
  • Mentos candy
  • Index cards

Diet Coke and Mentos Experiment Instructions

STEP 1: Roll up an index card into a tube and tape it together. The tube needs to be large enough to hold the Mentos and still allow them to fall out easily.

STEP 2: Tape the tube to the top of your bottle, but only tape on one side. An index card needs to be able to fit underneath the tube from one side.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

STEP 3: Place the other index card under your tube and attach your string to it with tape.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

STEP 4: Drop the Mentos into the tube.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

STEP 5: Now back away with the string in hand. Pull the string, which will also pull out the index card, allowing the candy to fall in.

💡 NOTE: If you can, set up a measuring tape in the background to help record the height of the eruption. Or place a piece of tape at a certain height on a wall or garage door to get an approximate idea of the height of your eruptions!

If you’re recording the eruption, use the slow mode function to capture the peak height more easily. You’ll be able to pause and check out the fountain height.

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Watch the excitement from a safe, and clean distance!

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Coke and Mentos Science

Inside the Coke or soda is dissolved carbon dioxide gas, which forms a bond with the water, making the soda taste fizzy when you drink it. This is called a carbonated beverage. Usually, you can find these gas bubbles coming from the soda, creating a bit of foam in a glass.

However, much of the gas is trapped on the surface of the soda, waiting to get out! It is held there by a scientific concept called surface tension . Once the mentos are added, the gas bonds break down more quickly due to the candy’s rough surface.

Adding Mentos speeds up this process because more bubbles form on the Mentos’s surface than on the bottle’s side, pushing the liquid up. This is an example of a change in the state of matter ; the carbon dioxide dissolved in Diet Coke moves to a gaseous state.

💡Did you know you can try this experiment with other candies and even pennies? That’s because it’s a physical change instead of a chemical one! Go ahead and experiment!

coke mentos and baking soda experiment

How to Apply the Scientific Method

Mentos candy are relatively dense and sink quickly, causing a powerful, fast eruption; EYE PROTECTION is recommended if you are standing close!

You can extend this Mentos and coke experiment below with additional suggestions. Older kiddos will benefit from learning about and incorporating the scientific method !

If you want to set up an experiment with several trials, pick one thing to change, such as the type of soda! Don’t change everything! You need to change the independent variable and measure the dependent variable .

You can also get kids started by writing down their hypotheses before diving into the experiment. What do they think will happen when the Mentos is added?

After performing the experiment, kids can conclude what happened and how it matched their initial hypotheses. You can always change a hypothesis upon testing your theory!

Expand the Experiment

What about crushed Mentos? Change the size of the Mentos by breaking them into small pieces to test whether that changes the amount of foam produced.

What about soda flavors? Compare different types of soda while adding the same amount of Mentos to each. Which produces the most foam, diet coke or original coke? How about Orange, Root Beer, or Sprite? Does club soda or seltzer erupt?

What about temperature? Does ice-cold Diet Coke work better than room-temperature Diet Coke?

What about mint flavors? Do Mentos mints or Fruit Mentos work better?

What about alternative items? What can you try instead of Mentos candy? Will it produce the same results or a similar height of eruptions? Other options could include pennies, rock salt, or different size candy!

Mentos and Coke Science Fair Experiment

Science projects are an excellent tool for older kids to show what they know about science. They can also be used in various environments, including classrooms, homeschools, and groups.

Kids can take everything they have learned about using the scientific method , stating a hypothesis, creating variables , and analyzing and presenting data.

Want to turn this Diet Coke and Mentos rocket into a cool science project? Check out these helpful resources below.

  • Easy Science Fair Projects
  • Science Project Tips From A Teacher
  • Science Fair Board Ideas
  • Scientific Method Explained

More Fun Science Projects to Try

  • Skittles Experiment
  • Baking Soda and Vinegar Volcano
  • Lava Lamp Experiment
  • Growing Borax Crystals
  • Pop Rocks and Soda
  • Magic Milk Experiment
  • Egg In Vinegar Experiment
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coke mentos and baking soda experiment

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coke mentos and baking soda experiment

Mentos and Coke

Jered Richter, Laura Houlberg, Dayna Kam, Aubrey West

Table of Contents:

    Go Up

    Intro

    Experiment

    Data/Analysis

    Conclusion

    Bibliography

Introduction:

Mentos and Coke are our generation's Baking Soda and Vinegar. Made famous by internet videos, and Mythbusters in 2006, it was thought that this effect was a reaction of what happens when the gum arabic and gelatin, caffeine, potassium benzoate, and aspartame is combined. What actually happens during the reaction has yet to be figured out, but most people agree on a popular explanation. The reaction works like this: each Mento has thousands of nucleation sites, tiny surface pits, which make a perfect place for the formation of carbon dioxide bubbles. When the Mentos and Coke combine, the bubbles start a huge reaction. Some fountains can be almost ten meters high. The gas is released and pushes the Coke up to the top with great force. There isn't a lot of research done about Mentos and Coke yet, since it is a new phenomenon.

Question: What is the relationship between the number of Mentos used and the height of the geyser which the reaction produces?      

Our group wants to find out the relation between how many Mentos are used, and how high the fountain sprays. We want to know what kind of function this relation follows. 

Hypothesis: If we plot the heights of the geysers in relation to the number of Mentos used, then it will produce a graph similar to that of a root function.

We hypothesize that the plotted points will follow the pattern of a square root function, which would show a steep increase at first, and then even out the farther we go along the x-axis. In the experiments done by Fritz Grobe, and Stephen Voltz, the geysers topped out at eight meters. When Mythbusters did their experiment, they set a record at twenty-nine feet (9 meters). We do not expect our geysers to reach these heights, because we do not do this on a regular basis, as do Grobe and Voltz. It will be easier for us to make mistakes, such as letting too much carbon dioxide out before we drop the Mentos.

Experiment: Top

•          12 bottles of Coke

•          78 Mentos

•          Sticky notes

•          Meter stick

•          Video analysis program (Logger Pro)

•          Toothpick

•          Geyser tube

•          Video camera

Independent: Number of Mentos

Dependent: Height of geyser

Constants: Volume of Coke, shape of bottle, temperature of Coke, Mentos' style of entry

1. Set up a video camera to film the experiment

2. Measure and mark one meter and two meters on vertical surface next to Coke bottle, to create a reference for distance when using video analysis

3. Put the appropriate number of Mentos into the geyser tube and insert pin into hole to keep the Mentos from falling out

4. Quickly open Coke bottle and insert geyser tube with Mentos into opening

5. Remove pin from tube, letting Mentos fall into bottle. Hold tube with your hand so that it stays relatively vertical inside neck of bottle

6. Allow geyser to reach maximum height, and then die down

7. Repeat steps 3-6 with a new bottle of Coke each time until you have done a trial for the following numbers of Mentos: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12

8. Use Logger Pro to find heights of geysers each trial, by using video analysis with the videos taken during experiment

Data/Analysis: Top

            Table of Heights:

# of Mentos      Height of Geyser (m)

·         1

·         0.2832

·         2

·         0.6719

·         3

·         0.8542

·         4

·         0.9419

·         5

·         1.051

·         6

·         1.216

·         7

·         1.241

·         8

·         1.277

·         9

·         1.32

·         10

·         1.367

·          11

·         1.452

·         12

·         1.559

Data file: text .:. Excel

Note: x-axis = Number of Mentos, y-axis = Height in Meters.

This graph does a good job revealing the relationship between the number of Mentos put in a Coke and the height which the geyser will reach. At first when a Mento is added, it affects the results dramatically. As the number of Mentos grew, the impact of each additional Mento decreased. This outcome makes sense for the following reason: At the beginning of the experiment, the ratio of Mento to Coke was very small and this meant that another Mento would greatly affect the ratio, but as the ratio grew, the effect got smaller and smaller. For example, if you go from 1 Mento/ 1 Liter of Coke to 2 Mentos/ 1 Liter of Coke, then the amount of surface area the Coke can reach on the Mentos is doubled, or in other words, increased by one 100%; however, if you go from 11 Mentos/ 1 Liter of Coke to 12 Mentos/ 1 Liter of Coke then you are only increasing the surface area by 9%.

Conclusion: Top

Hypothesis:

After conducting our experiment and analyzing our results, we found that our hypothesis was correct. When we graphed the height of the geyser depending on the number of Mentos we dropped in the coke bottle, it strongly resembled a root function. The height increased significantly when we started out and slowly started to top out as we increased the number of Mentos.

            Review of Experiment:

Sources of error includes the loss of carbon dioxide that was released in the time elapsed between when we removed the cap of the coke bottle and when we dropped in the Mentos. Also, when there was a higher amount of Mentos, the geyser would push some back up and out of the tube. If we were to conduct this experiment again, we would find another method of inserting the Mentos in the coke bottle in order to release less carbon dioxide and keep the Mentos inside of the Bottle. We could also try different types of soda to see how and if that would affect the geyser.

Bibliography: Top

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14114-science-of-mentosdiet-coke-explosions-explained.html

http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/consumer/faq/mentos.shtml

"The Chemical Physics of Food" by Peter Belton

Various videos on Youtube.com and the Eepybird.com site

http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/experiment/00000109

Other Related Sites: Top

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1450915772177922792#

Just another Coke and Mentos video

http://www.zap2it.com/tv/news/zap-mythbustersmentos,0,4325641.story

The mythbuster's explanation of Coke and Mentos

http://www.stormthecastle.com/how-to-make-a/how-to-make-a-spectacular-volcano.htm

Using Coke and Mentos for a Volcano

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Diet-Coke-and-Mentos-Rocket

How to make a rocket with Coke and Mento's

http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to-diet-coke-mentos-bomb-explosion-prank-219842/

Coke and Mentos bomb! Just for kicks.

COMMENTS

  1. Erupting Mentos and Coke Experiment

    STEP 2. Choose one variety of Mentos candy to use for the experiment. Prepare the candy by removing it from the sleeve and placing one sleeve of candy into each cup. STEP 3. Pour equal amounts of the different sodas into cups. STEP 4. Simultaneously, drop the candy into the soda. STEP 5.

  2. Experiment: Coca Cola and Baking Soda! Super Reaction!

    What will happen if you mixed high concentration baking soda with Coca-Cola and Mentos? Look.Production Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemi...

  3. Erupting Diet Coke® with Mentos®

    Find an exterior wall of a building with no windows and set a Diet Coke bottle at the base of the wall. Use a tape measure and blue painter's tape to mark off the height from the top of the bottle in meters. Then do this activity three times, with the bottle in front of the tape-marked wall, videotaping it each time.

  4. Coke® & Mentos®

    Introduction. The Diet Coke and Mentos experiment (shown in action in Figure 1 below) is all over the Internet, but how does it work? You might think that there is some ingredient in a Mentos candy that is causing a chemical reaction with the soda, like the way baking soda reacts with vinegar. But this is not a chemical reaction at all!

  5. Mentos and Coke Experiment: How-To Plus Free Worksheet

    If using a geyser tube, load the Mentos. If using a homemade paper roll, drop the Mentos into the roll while holding the bottom closed with your finger. 3. Placing a 2-liter bottle of Coke on a flat surface, remove the cap, and drop the Mentos into the open Coke bottle. 4.

  6. Spurting Science: Erupting Diet Coke with Mentos

    In the Diet Coke bottle the Mentos candy provides a rough surface that allows the bonds between the carbon dioxide gas and water to break more easily, helping to create carbon dioxide bubbles. As ...

  7. Mentos and Coke Experiment

    Put the index card on top of the tube loader and turn the tube upside down. The candy should not fall out. Be ready. The reaction happens fast, so don't have your face over the bottle. Place the index card and candies over the mouth of the bottle. Make sure the candies are in line with the mouth of the bottle.

  8. Mentos and Soda Experiment!!

    Today we do the Mentos and Soda Experiment, using Coke, Diet Coke and testing a lot of other sodas with Mentos candy! We want to see what soda causes the BI...

  9. Coke and Mento Experiment

    The science experiments my children talk about for months afterwards are generally the messy ones, like our splatter patterns, glow in the dark oobleck, baking soda experiments and the well known coke and mento experiment.. If you try this classic chemis t ry experiment definitely do it outside as it's VERY messy and sticky. Sometimes you'll see it called a coke and mento geyser, as the ...

  10. Coke and Mentos Experiment

    By creating a mentos tower, the kids can drop all of the mentos in at once. 2. Place your bottle of coke in a large tub. Once again the tub is optional and is only used to help clean up afterwards. If you prefer, you can do this experiment outside on the grass. Just make sure that your outdoor area has a flat surface you can use.

  11. Mentos & Diet Soda Chemical Volcano

    How the Mentos and Diet Soda Experiment Works . The Diet Coke and Mentos geyser is the result of a physical process rather than a chemical reaction. There's a lot of carbon dioxide dissolves in the soda, which gives it its fizz. When you drop a Mentos into the soda, tiny bumps on the candy surface give the carbon dioxide molecules a nucleation ...

  12. Mentos Exploding Soda Easy Science Experiment

    Slide the piece of straw through both holes. These will create a barrier to keep Mentos from falling through until you are ready for them to do so. Remove the cap from the 2-liter Diet Coke. Tape the construction paper cylinder around the mouth of the 2-liter soda bottle. Find an outside area that is easy to clean up and can get a little messy.

  13. Mentos and coke

    1 roll of Mentos mint (it must be mint) A 1.5 or 2 L bottle of Diet Coke (Coca-Cola Light) 1 tube, open in one end - This tube must fit all of the Mentos stacked on top of each other, just like in the Mentos roll. And when open in one end, all the Mentos should quickly slide out. In some countries, there are these aspirin tubes that are perfect.

  14. How to do the Mentos in Coke experiment

    The Mentos in Coke experiment is a fun science project idea you can try with your kids. See how high your soda fountain goes when you mix soda and Mentos to...

  15. Mentos and Diet Coke Experiment

    It's been called the "vinegar and baking soda" reaction for a new generation. While science teachers have been dropping candies and mints into 2-liter bottles of soda for years to release all of the dissolved carbon dioxide, the Mentos and Diet Coke reaction became world-famous in 2005.

  16. Mentos and Diet Coke!

    1. Very slowly and carefully, open a new bottle of colorless soda. 2. Tilt the cup and slowly pour the soda down the inside of the cup to make as few bubbles as possible. 3. Place a straw in the soda and look at the straw from the side. 4. Take the straw out of the soda and put a pipe cleaner in. Look from the side to see if bubbles also form ...

  17. Diet Coke and Mentos Eruption

    Diet Coke and Mentos Experiment Instructions. STEP 1: Roll up an index card into a tube and tape it together. The tube needs to be large enough to hold the Mentos and still allow them to fall out easily. STEP 2: Tape the tube to the top of your bottle, but only tape on one side. An index card needs to be able to fit underneath the tube from one ...

  18. Diet Coke and Mentos Science Experiment Explained

    Diet coke and mentos explained: We explain the science behind the Diet Coke and Mentos experiment: The mint sweets provide a surface for the gas in the cola to cling on to. The bubbles of gas get larger and as they are lighter than the cola liquid, they quickly shoot to the top of the bottle. This all happens very quickly and a fountain of cola ...

  19. Mentos and Coke

    Set up a video camera to film the experiment. 2. Measure and mark one meter and two meters on vertical surface next to Coke bottle, to create a reference for distance when using video analysis. 3. Put the appropriate number of Mentos into the geyser tube and insert pin into hole to keep the Mentos from falling out.

  20. PDF Diet Coke and Mentos: What is really behind this physical reaction?

    Mentos and baking soda trials, the pH of the Diet Coke be-fore and after the reaction was measured by a pH meter with a two point calibration. Sample morphology was determined by imaging the samples in an environmental scanning electron microscope SEM .4 The uncoated samples were imaged in low vacuum mode. Quantitative surface roughness ...

  21. Experiment: Coca Cola, Vinegar, Baking Soda and Mentos ...

    #cocacola #experiment #mentosCoca Cola Rocket and Mentos Underground: https://youtu.be/kyIpZyY8tyQ Coca Cola, Fanta, Sprite and Mentos Underground: https://y...

  22. Amazon.com: Steve Spangler Science

    Buy Steve Spangler Science - WGEY-505 Geyser Tube Experiment, 1 Tube - Science Experiment for Kids, Turns Soda Bottle and Mentos Candies into Erupting Geyser: Science Kits & Toys - Amazon.com FREE DELIVERY possible on eligible purchases

  23. Experiment: Coca-Cola, mentos, Dishwashing soap, Colgate and Baking

    Experiment: Coca-Cola, mentos, Dishwashing soap, Colgate and Baking soda mixing#CocaColaVsmentos Today I have an experiment to show By taking Coca-Cola mixed...

  24. Experiment: Coca Cola and Mentos and Baking Soda! Super Effect!

    #PowerTest #Mentos #ColaHello everyone, in this video you will see what will happen if you mix Coca Cola, mentos and super secret baking soda!Thanks for wa...